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Rutgers law students

Rutgers Law School 

Spotlight: 3+3 Program

The 3+3 Program enables highly qualified students to complete both a bachelor’s degree and a graduate law degree (Juris Doctor, or “JD”) in six years, rather than the usual seven.

  • Save time and tuition by finishing your degrees on an accelerated track
  • Access thorough advising during your undergraduate career
  • Connect to employment opportunities in the NYC, Philadelphia, and New Jersey legal markets
Rutgers Camden

Find Your Place in the Legal Community

With locations in Newark and Camden, Rutgers Law School is positioned amid three of the nation’s largest legal markets—New York City, Philadelphia, and New Jersey—putting students in a prime position to gain critical hands-on legal experience. From internships to full-time employment after graduation, Rutgers Law School graduates join law firms and businesses of all sizes, government agencies, nonprofits, and judicial clerkships.

13
Formal dual degrees
30+
Clinics and Pro Bono Projects
90.2%
Employment rate within 10 months of graduation 

Class of 2019

20,000+
Strong alumni network

Exceptional Experiential Learning

Whether it's helping clients through pro bono service work, earning credit at one of our award-winning clinics, or taking part in a field placement or judicial externship, at Rutgers Law School, students get real-world experience long before graduation.

Camden courtroom

Fulbright Fellow M'Ballou Sanogho

M’Ballou Sanogho RLAW ’20, was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to study international law at the CY Cergy Paris University School of Law. She said her goal is to contribute to the lives of victims of human rights crimes as an attorney.

During law school, she worked as a legal intern with the International Justice Project, representing victims of the war in Sudan who sought asylum in the United States. She conducted client interviews and drafted reported cases of human rights violations, which were submitted to the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

“My interest in becoming an international lawyer can be traced back to my time as a child in Ivory Coast, West Africa," she said "At a young age, I faced many of the devastating situations endured by my country at large. I experienced civil war and adverse cultural practices. The experiences have triggered my desire to contribute to the lives of people who are facing similar experiences, especially in Africa, where human rights violations are still very prominent.”

 

M’Ballou Sanogho