Brilliant Minds Visit Rutgers

From across the Hudson River, around the nation, and the world beyond our shores, exceptional thinkers come to Rutgers to enlighten, engage, and entertain. Spring semester lectures at the New Brunswick, Newark, and Camden campuses cover the gamut of human inquiry.

Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns; Strategies for First Fiction; Producing Bollywood; Antimatter, Matter, and How We Came to Be; My Princess Boy, A Tale of Acceptance; and Structure, Reactions, Astrophysics are just some of the topics you can explore with our standout lineup of speakers. Peruse our sampling of notable spring semester speakers and see who grabs your attention. Most events are free and open to the public.

February

Featured Speaker

Joycelyn EldersJoycelyn Elders, M.D.: Health Disparities in Black America
Date: February 18, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Public Policy/American History
Joycelyn Elders, the nation’s surgeon general under President Clinton, will discuss “Health Disparities in Black America” as she delivers the 2012 Marion Thompson Wright Lecture. This year’s theme for the ongoing lecture series is “Taking Good Care: A History of Health and Wellness in the Black Community.”

Lt. Col. John J. Thomas, Lt. Col. Brent Johnson, Lt. Col.
David N. Kincaid Jr.: Grand Strategy—Three Perspectives
on National Security

Lt. Col. John J. Thomas, Lt. Col. Brent Johnson, Lt. Col. David N. Kincaid Jr.Date: February 1, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Public Policy

Lt. Col. John J. Thomas, left, Lt. Col. Brent Johnson, center, and Lt. Col. David N. Kincaid Jr., right, will present differing perspectives in a panel discussion of a grand national security strategy as part of the General Henry “Hap” Arnold Lecture Series sponsored by the United States Air Force Air War College and the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School.

Neil Ayres: Polymers and Peptoids

Date: February 2, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Chemistry

Neil Ayres, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Cincinnati, will talk about polymers incorporating N-alkyl urea peptoids. He appears through the Department of Chemistry Seminar Series.

Karin Chenoweth and Christina Theokas: Getting It Done:
Leading Academic Success in Unexpected Schools

Karin Chenoweth & Christina TheokasDate: February 2, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: Education

Karin Chenoweth, left, and Christina Theokas will discuss their book Getting It Done: Leading Academic Success in Unexpected Schools at an educational forum for school leaders, principals, aspiring principals, and charter school directors and supervisors. The event is sponsored by the Community Leadership Center.

Nadine Unger: Historical Cropland Expansion and Climate
Change 

Nadine UngerDate: February 3, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Environmental Sciences
(Photo credit: William Sacco)

Nadine Unger, an assistant professor in the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, presents "Historical Cropland Expansion Effects on the Short-Lived Climate Forcers." The talk will cover how human land cover change between 1850 and 2005 has led to a large reduction in biogenic secondary organic aerosol loading that warms the climate and entirely counteracts the cooling due to the surface albedo change. Albedo, a measure of the earth's reflectivity, is the amount of solar energy reflected from earth back to space. Her talk is presented through the Department of Environmental Sciences Seminar Series.

William Harris: The Omega Wars—N-6 and N-3 Fatty Acids
in Cardiovascular Disease

William HarrisDate: February 6, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Food Science

William Harris, an internationally recognized expert on omega-3 fatty acids and how they can benefit patients with heart disease, discusses the role of fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. His talk is presented through the Rutgers Center for Lipid Research Seminar Series and is cosponsored by the New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health.

Larry Wennogle: Drug Discovery for Alzheimer's Disease

Larry WennogleDate: February 6, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Genetics

Larry Wennogle, vice president for drug discovery at New York-based Intra-Cellular Therapies, is an expert in the biochemical basis of disease. His talk, "Drug Discovery for Alzheimer's Disease," is presented through the Department of Genetics Seminar Series.

Dázon Dixon Diallo and Terry McGovern: A Conversation
about HIV/AIDS, Gender, and Human Rights

Dázon Dixon Diallo & Terry McGovernDate: February 7, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Women's and Gender Studies

Alison R. Bernstein, director of the Institute for Women's Leadership, will moderate "A Conversation about HIV/AIDS, Gender, and Human Rights" with Dázon Dixon Diallo, left, founder and president of SisterLove, the first women's HIV/AIDS organization in the southwestern United States, and Terry McGovern, senior program officer, HIV/AIDS Human Rights–Gender Rights and Equality Program, at the Ford Foundation. The event is sponsored by the Institute for Women's Leadership.

Sheila Jasanoff: Life in the Gray Zone—Chimeras and Constitutions

Sheila JasanoffDate: February 7, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Cultural Studies

Sheila Jasanoff, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, is a pioneer in the field of science and technology studies. Her talk will explore how "the life sciences today are generating a host of entities that cross lines once thought to be fixed by nature or divine mandate: between living and nonliving, animal and human, and things and people. How to classify these boundary-crossing entities poses problems for scientists, lawyers, ethicists, and policymakers … Determining the status of things that cross natural and social boundaries belongs to a hitherto unrecognized field of bioconstitutionalism, in which relations among science, society, and the state are together at stake." She appears at Rutgers through the Center for Cultural Analysis's Public Knowledge: Institutions, Networks, and Collectives Seminar Series and the center's Working Group on Public Knowledge.

Elliott Kalan: Writer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

Elliott KalanDate: February 8, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science

Elliott Kalan is an Emmy Award-winning writer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, cowriter of Earth: The Book, and a freelance comedian. He has written for Discover Magazine, Metro, the New York Public Library, and Marvel Comics, and coproduced the "Gay Cowboy" montage for the 78th Academy Awards. He is cohost of the podcast "The Flop House" and says he wants to be Andy Rooney. His talk, "Humor and Politics: How to Write Jokes When the News Is Ridiculous," is presented through the Eagleton Institute of Politics events lineup.

Helen Benedict and Stephen O'Connor: Two Writers, One Household

Helen Benedict & Stephen O'ConnorDate: February 15, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: English
(Photo credit (r): Emma Bennett O'Connor)

Award-winning writers Helen Benedict, left, author of The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq, and Stephen O'Connor, author of Rescue and Here Comes Another Lesson, come to read from their works and present a workshop as part of the Visiting Writers Series hosted by the Rutgers–Camden MFA in Creative Writing program.

Terrance Hayes: National Book Award Winner for Poetry

Terrance HayesDate: February 15, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: English

Terrance Hayes is the author of four books of poetry, all nationally acclaimed. His book Lighthead won the 2010 National Book Award in Poetry. He visits Rutgers through the Writers at Rutgers Reading Series.

David Weisburd: The Criminology of Place

David WeisburdDate: February 15, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Criminal Justice

David Weisburd holds a joint appointment as a distinguished professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and also as the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at the Hebrew University Law School in Jerusalem. He will share findings from his new book The Criminology of Place: Street Segments and Our Understanding of the Crime Problem as part of the School of Criminal Justice's Alcatel/Lucent Distinguished Lecture Series.

Richard Longstreth: Buildings People Love to Hate

Date: February 17, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: British Studies

Richard Longstreth, director of historic preservation and professor of American civilization at George Washington University, will be speaking about “Buildings People Love to Hate” at a one-day conference, “Concrete City: Brutalism and Preservation.” The conference, sponsored by the Rutgers British Studies Center, will reexamine the origins and influence of the New Brutalism, an architectural movement that dates from the 1950s to the early 1970s.

Alan Brake: The Death and Life of Great American
Landscapes

Alan BrakeDate: February 22, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Landscape Architecture

Alan Brake, midwest editor of the Architect's Newspaper, has written extensively for Architectural Record, the New York Times, and many other leading publications. He presents "The Death and Life of Great American Landscapes: Criticism and Contemporary Practice" through the Landscape Architecture Lecture Series.

Louis Clark: The Six Stages of Whistleblowing

Louis ClarkDate: February 22, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Public Policy/Law

Every year, thousands of Americans witness wrongdoing on the job. Who are the people who come forward for the truth? When the American Whistleblower Tour makes a stop at Rutgers–Newark, Louis Clark, president of the Government Accountability Project, will host a panel discussion on “The Six Stages of Whistleblowing.” This Government Accountability Project visit is sponsored by the School of Public Affairs and Administration and School of Law–Newark.

Sherry Turkle: Leading Thinker about Technology
and Culture

Sherry TurkleDate: February 22, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Sociology
(Photo credit: Peter Urban)

Technology is redrawing the boundaries between intimacy and solitude. We may spend hours "connected," but does that mean we're communicating? Sherry Turkle, an MIT professor and founder of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self, will be speaking at the Department of Sociology's Colloquium Series on the topic "Alone Together: The New Intimacies and Solitudes of the Digital Age."

Gayatri Gopinath: Feminist Theory and Queer Studies
Scholar

Gayatri GopinathDate: February 23, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Women's and Gender Studies

Gayatri Gopinath, director of Gender and Sexuality Studies at New York University, will be speaking about "Reframing the Family, Reframing the Region: Queer Diasporic Genealogies" as part of the Institute for Research on Women Distinguished Lecture Series, (De)Generations: Reimagining Communities. The talk is cosponsored by the Collective for Asian American Scholarship.

Ramiro Martínez Jr.: Immigration and Crime Studies

Ramiro Martínez Jr.Date: February 23, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Criminal Justice
(Photo credit: Christopher Huang/Northeastern)

Ramiro Martínez Jr. is a professor at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Northeastern University and a quantitative criminologist. In his talk, he examines rates of violent crime in immigrant communities over the past 30 years. He appears through the School of Criminal Justice Lecture Series.

Ed Goetz: Resident Perspectives on the Dismantling
of Public Housing—An Oral History

Ed GoetzDate: February 27, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Public Policy

Ed Goetz, director of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs at the University of Minnesota, visits Rutgers to speak on his oral history project examining resident reactions to the dismantling of public housing in the United States. The talk is sponsored by the Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies. The event is free, but due to limited seating, please reserve a spot by February 20 by calling 973-353-1750 or emailing irenew@rutgers.edu.

Daniel Nagin: Deterrence and Crime: What Do We Know?

Daniel NaginDate: February 27, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Criminal Justice

Daniel Nagin is the Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University and since January 2006 has served as the school’s associate dean of faculty. Nagin is an elected fellow of the American Society of Criminology and of the American Society for the Advancement of Science. He is the 2006 recipient of the American Society of Criminology Edwin H. Sutherland Award (for research contributions), and he just finished chairing the National Research Council Committee on Deterrence and the Death Penalty. He appears through the School of Criminal Justice Lecture Series.

Marie Howe and Monica Youn: American Poets

Marie Howe & Monica YounDate: February 28, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Creative Writing
(Photo credit (l): Brad Fowler)

Marie Howe, left, the author of three volumes of poetry, including The Kingdom of Ordinary Time, has been a fellow at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College and a recipient of National Endowment for the Arts and Guggenheim fellowships. Monica Youn's poems have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. Her collection Ignatz is a series of poems loosely based on the mouse character from George Herriman's Krazy Kat comic strip of the 1920s–1930s. The poets appear as part of the Writers at Newark Reading Series sponsored by the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program at Rutgers–Newark and cosponsored by the Newark Public Library and an Essex County Local Arts Grant.

Giannina Braschi: Groundbreaking Author

Giannina BraschiDate: February 29, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: English
(Photo credit: Cato Lein)

Giannina Braschi, an author credited with writing the first "Spanglish" novel, will be reading from United States of Banana, a work of fiction set in post-9/11 New York City, at an event sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Education, the College Avenue Campus deans, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies, the Program in Comparative Literature, the Institute for Research on Women, and the Center for Latino Arts and Culture.

Jonathan Sarna: That Obnoxious Order: Ulysses S. Grant
and the Jews

Jonathan SarnaDate: February 29, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Jewish Studies

Jonathan Sarna, the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University and chief historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History, presents "That Obnoxious Order: Ulysses S. Grant and the Jews." The lecture, drawing on Sarna's upcoming book, When General Grant Expelled the Jews, is given as part of the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life events lineup. The talk is the Toby and Herbert Stolzer Endowed Program.

March

Featured Speaker

Patrick KennedyHon. Patrick Kennedy: One Mind for Research—The Politics of Advancing Brain Health Research
Date: March 8, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science
Patrick Kennedy served 16 years in the U.S. House of Representatives as a congressman from Rhode Island and is predominantly known as the author and lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This dramatic piece of legislation provides tens of millions of Americans who were previously denied care with access to mental health treatment. Now, Kennedy is the cofounder of the One Mind for Research campaign, which unites scientists working in various domains of brain research toward a common goal of making more progress on brain disorders from schizophrenia to traumatic brain injury. His talk is the 2012 Albert W. Lewitt Lecture, given as part of the Eagleton Institute of Politics events lineup.

Stacy A. Cordery: Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable
Founder of the Girl Scouts

Stacy A. CorderyDate: March 7, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: History

Monmouth College historian Stacy A. Cordery, author of the first full-scale biography of maverick Girl Scouts founder Juliette Gordon Low, is receiving national attention for telling the complete life story of the vibrant and headstrong woman who brought the Girl Scouts of the USA into existence and touched the lives of millions of girls and women. Cordery discusses her book Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts in a Rutgers–Camden talk given in celebration of the Girl Scouts' centennial in March.

Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri: Medievalism in
Contemporary Political Cultures—America and Europe in
Contrast

Tommaso di Carpegna FalconieriDate: March 5, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Medieval Studies

Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri is a permanent researcher (ricercatore confermato) at the University of Urbino, Italy, where he teaches medieval history. His principal research themes are the history of Rome and the Roman Church in the Middle Ages, topics about which he has published numerous articles and two books. Currently, he is concentrating on the use of ideas of the Middle Ages in contemporary politics, the subject of his latest book, Medioevo Militante: La Politica di Oggi Alle Prese con Barbari e Crociati. His lecture at Rutgers is a medieval take on contemporary American and European cultures. The talk is given as part of the Medieval Studies Program events lineup.

Brandon Albright: Same Spirit, Different Movement:
Urban and Hip-Hop Dance Symposium

Brandon AlbrightDate: March 21, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Disciplines: Dance, Culture
(Photo credit: Donna Permell)

At this all-day dance symposium, Brandon Albright, artistic director of Philadelphia-based multicultural dance company Illstyle & Peace Productions, will explore the history and legacy of hip-hop dance from “old school” to contemporary styles with active participation by audience members. A daytime lecture/demonstration will feature members of Illstyle & Peace. An hour-long performance by the company in the evening will be followed by a reception. The event is sponsored by the Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience.

Bill Rasmussen: The Founder of ESPN

Bill RasmussenDate: March 21, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Disciplines: Business

Bill Rasmussen, a Rutgers alumnus and the founder of ESPN, returns to campus to share stories about the early days of the sports network and how being an entrepreneur shaped his life. The talk is sponsored by the Rutgers University Programming Association.

Ira Shapiro: The Last Great Senate: Courage and
Statesmanship in Times of Crisis

Ira ShapiroDate: March 21, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science

Ira Shapiro, who spent 12 years in the U.S. Senate as a senior staff member, will talk about his new book, The Last Great Senate: Courage and Statesmanship in Times of Crisis, which examines the distinguished U.S. Senate of the 1970s. His lecture is given as part of the Eagleton Institute of Politics events lineup.

Patrick Sharkey: Thinking in Generations: The Persistence
of Neighborhood Inequality and the Implications for
Urban Policy

Date: March 21, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: Sociology, Urban Studies

Patrick Sharkey is an assistant professor of sociology at New York University and the author of the forthcoming book Stuck in Place: Urban Neighborhoods and the End of Progress toward Racial Equality. His lecture, “Thinking in Generations: The Persistence of Neighborhood Inequality and the Implications for Urban Policy,” is delivered as a Center for Urban Research and Education event.

Hamadou Saliah-Hassane: African Education in the
Digital Age

Hamadou Saliah-HassaneDate: March 22, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Disciplines: Computer Science/Education/
African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures

Hamadou Saliah-Hassane, professor of science and technology at Téluq, the Distance Learning University of the University of Québec, Montreal, and a researcher at the LICEF Research Center, presents “African Education in the Digital Age.” The talk is featured in the Technologies Without Borders: Technologies Across Borders lecture series. It is cosponsored by the Rutgers Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs, the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures, the Center for African Studies, and the School of Arts and Sciences Office of International Programs.

Robert Alter: The Pleasures and Perils of Translating
the Bible

Date: March 26, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Jewish Studies

Robert Alter, professor of Hebrew and comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author of 22 books, including two prize-winning volumes on biblical narrative and poetry and award-winning translations of Genesis and of the Five Books of Moses. His talk, “The Pleasures and Perils of Translating the Bible,” is given as part of the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life events lineup, in conjunction with the Henry Schwartzman Endowed Faculty Seminar.

Dan Conaway and Gabriel Fried: Creating a Meaningful
and Profitable Writing Career

Dan Conaway & Gabriel FriedDate: March 28, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: English

Dan Conaway, left, a literary agent at Writers House, and Gabriel Fried, a poet and editor who is the author of Making the New Lamb Take, will discuss how to create a meaningful and profitable writing career. They appear as part of the Visiting Writers Series hosted by the Rutgers–Camden MFA in Creative Writing program.

Denis Johnson: National Book Award Winner in Fiction

Denis JohnsonDate: March 28, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: English

Denis Johnson is the author of plays, poetry, and fiction. His novel Tree of Smoke won the 2007 National Book Award in Fiction. He visits Rutgers through the Writers at Rutgers Reading Series.

Jeff Manza: A Broken Public? Americans' Responses to the
Great Recession

Jeff ManzaDate: March 28, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Sociology

Jeff Manza, chair of the sociology department at New York University, will discuss the Great Recession and Americans’ responses to it at the Department of Sociology’s Colloquium Series. Manza has analyzed how different types of social identities and inequalities in the United States and elsewhere influence political processes such as voting behavior, partisanship, and public opinion.

Arthur Kleinman: New Approaches to the Study of Moral Experience

Date: March 29, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging

Harvard professor Arthur Kleinman, a prominent psychiatrist and anthropologist, will speak about “New Approaches to the Study of Moral Experience” at an event organized by the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research. The event is part of the institute’s Brown Bag Seminar Series. Kleinman, a leading figure in medical anthropology, cultural psychiatry, global health, social medicine, and medical humanities, is the Victor and William Fung Director of Harvard’s Asia Center.

Cheryl LaFleur: Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner:
Update on Federal Energy Policy

Cheryl LaFleurDate: March 29, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Public Policy

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Commissioner Cheryl LaFleur will speak at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. Her talk, "An Update on Federal Energy Policy: Choices for the Future," is given as part of the Center for Energy, Economic, and Environmental Policy events lineup.

April

Featured Speaker

Mary RobinsonMary Robinson: The Former President of Ireland on Climate Justice
Date: April 2, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Environment, Geography, Political Science
Mary Robinson, first woman president of Ireland and former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will explain how climate change is a social justice issue. She will speak about efforts to secure a vision of “climate justice” that links human rights and development, safeguarding the rights of those most vulnerable, and sharing the burdens and benefits of climate change and its resolution equitably and fairly. Her talk is given as a Rutgers Initiative on Climate and Society event. Lecture cosponsors include the Center for Women’s Global Leadership, Douglass Residential College, the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs, the Department of Geography, the Institute for Women’s Leadership, the Institute for Research on Women, and the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies.

Bernard Amadei: Founder of Engineers without Borders

Bernard AmadeiDate: April 2, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Engineering, Global Studies, Public Policy

Bernard Amadei, founder of Engineers without Borders (USA), cofounder of the Engineers without Borders International network, and professor of civil engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will discuss “Engineering in Community Development—Challenges and Opportunities.” His talk is given as the 2012 Mason Welch Gross Memorial Lecture and is cosponsored by the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Rutgers College Class of 1962.

Charles E. Cook Jr.: 2012 Political Outlook

Charles E. Cook Jr.Date: April 5, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science

Charles E. Cook Jr., editor and publisher of The Cook Political Report, takes a look at the current political climate and the 2012 races. His lecture is given as part of the Eagleton Institute of Politics events lineup.

Amaney Jamal: Transitions in the Arab World:
Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?

Amaney JamalDate: April 9, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science
(Photo credit: Ricardo Barros)

Amaney Jamal, associate professor of politics at Princeton University, presents "Transitions in the Arab World: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All?" as an Emerging Trends talk in the Department of Political Science speakers series.

Heidi W. Durrow and Tiphanie Yanique: Strategies for
First Fiction

Heidi W. Durrow and Tiphanie YaniqueDate: April 11, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Camden
Discipline: Creative Writing

Award-winning writers Heidi W. Durrow, left, author of The Girl Who Fell from the Sky, and Tiphanie Yanique, a Fullbright Scholar and author of How to Escape from a Leper Colony, will discuss strategies for writing your first fiction as a part of the Visiting Writers Series. The event is hosted by the Rutgers–Camden MFA in Creative Writing program.

César Braga-Pinto: Generation, Degeneration,
Miscegenation

César Braga-PintoDate: April 12, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Women's and Gender Studies

Associate professor César Braga-Pinto of Northwestern University will be giving a talk, "Generation, Degeneration, Miscegenation," as part of the Institute for Research on Women Distinguished Lecture Series, (De)Generations: Reimagining Communities. The talk will focus on the role played by gender representations in debates around miscegenation around the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Tejaswini Ganti: Producing Bollywood: The Social and
Institutional Transformations of the Hindi Film Industry

Tejaswini GantiDate: April 12, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Anthropology

Tejaswini Ganti, assistant professor of anthropology at New York University, presents "Producing Bollywood: The Social and Institutional Transformations of the Hindi Film Industry." The talk is given as part of the Department of Anthropology Lecture Studies and is cosponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Program in South Asian Studies, and the Department of Journalism and Media Studies.

Boris Kayser: “Antimatter, Matter, and How We Came to Be”

Boris KayserDate: April 14, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Physics and Astronomy

Boris Kayser, a New Jersey native and an esteemed physicist at Fermilab, will deliver the 2012 Henry R. and Gladys V. Irons Lecture in Physics and Astronomy. His topic, “Antimatter, Matter, and How We Came to Be,” will explain what matter and antimatter are, how we make antimatter in the laboratory, and whether antimatter is a serious threat (as in Dan Brown’s novel Angels and Demons). His talk is part of the Spring 2012 Department of Physics and Astronomy Colloquium Series.

Cheryl Kilodavis: My Princess Boy, a Tale of Acceptance

Cheryl KilodavisDate: April 18, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Creative Writing, Culture

Cheryl Kilodavis, author of the children's book My Princess Boy, a tale about acceptance and affirmation of all gender expressions, is the keynote speaker for Pride Week sponsored by RU Pride and the LGBTQ & Diversity Resource Center.

Terry Tempest Williams: Citizen Writer

Terry Tempest WilliamsDate: April 18, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: English

Terry Tempest Williams is a writer and an advocate for many causes, from freedom of speech to environmental justice to women's health. She is the author of the environmental literature classic Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place and many other books and essays. She is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a John Smith Guggenheim Fellowship in creative nonfiction. In 2009, Williams was featured in Ken Burns' PBS series on the national parks. She visits Rutgers through the Writers at Rutgers Reading Series.

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen: Ground Wars: Personalized
Communication in Political Campaigns

Rasmus Kleis NielsenDate: April 19, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Political Science

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, research fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford and assistant professor at Roskilde University, Denmark, discusses his new book, Ground Wars: Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns, which examines the 2008 congressional elections. His lecture is given as part of the Eagleton Institute of Politics events lineup.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Uzodinma Iweala: Award-
Winning Novelists

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Uzodinma IwealaDate: April 24, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Creative Writing

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, left, is the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun. Her work has been recognized with the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction (2007) and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2008). Uzo Iweala is the author of Beasts of No Nation, which depicts a child soldier in an unnamed West African country. The novel, his debut, came out of his undergraduate thesis work at Harvard and was conducted under the supervision of writer Jamaica Kincaid. Beasts of No Nation earned the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Los Angeles Times Award for First Fiction. The authors appear as part of the Writers at Newark Reading Series sponsored by the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program at Rutgers–Newark and cosponsored by the Newark Public Library and an Essex County Local Arts Grant.

Kate Jones: Structure, Reactions, Astrophysics

Kate JonesDate: April 25, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–New Brunswick
Discipline: Physics and Astronomy

Kate Jones, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee, will speak about “Structure, Reactions, Astrophysics: Overlaps in Low-Energy Nuclear Physics” as part of the Spring 2012 Department of Physics and Astronomy Colloquium. Her work uses nuclear reactions to study the structure of nuclei, mostly to understand nucleosynthetic processes that occur in the cosmos.

Pauline Lipman, Deborah Meier, Richard Rothstein: New
Educational Paradigms: Reconceptualizing Education and
Schooling in Newark and Beyond

Date: April 26, 2012
Campus: Rutgers–Newark
Discipline: Education, Public Policy

Pauline Lipman of the University of Illinois at Chicago; Deborah Meier, an activist and educator with 45 years of experience in K–12 public schools; and Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute discuss the future of education and schooling in Newark—and beyond. The event is part of the Behind and Beyond the Debate Public Speaker Series on Education in Newark sponsored by the Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience.